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Monthly Archives: October 2014

Blogging U.’s Photo 101 Course: Post a Photo a Day

Blogging U.’s Photo 101 Course: Post a Photo a Day

The WordPress.com Blog

On The Daily Post, we host the popular Weekly Photo Challenge each Friday, and we’re always excited to see your snapshots from all over the world. We thought a free photoblogging course mixing the spirit of these photo challenges with bite-sized shooting tips would be a fun way to get you taking pictures and meeting your daily posting goals.

Introducing Blogging U.’s Photography 101 course

Photography 101 is an intro-level course, open to all. You might be a totally new blogger, an amateur photographer, a veteran photo challenge participant, or a pro-shooter. Or, you may be someone who wants to participate in the daily posting madness of November, alongside NaNoWriMo and NaBloPoMo enthusiasts, in a more visual way. Self-hosted bloggers and photographers on other platforms are also welcome to join us.

The basics:

  • A month-long course, starting November 3 and ending November 28. Weekend participation is optional.
  • No prerequisites, other than your camera.
  • We…

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Alert! : Time Lapse of All Nuclear Explosions on Earth from 1945 – 1998

Alert! : Time Lapse of All Nuclear Explosions on Earth from 1945 – 1998

PROPEL STEPS

It starts really slow — if you want to see real action, skip ahead to 1962 or so — but the buildup becomes overwhelming.

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).

Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen. Hashimoto, who began the project in 2003, says that he created it with the goal of showing”the fear and folly of nuclear weapons.”

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